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You Were Looking Away

As digital camera technology has grown exponentially, and overflown into our cameras and computers and everyday lives, I wanted to use the technology it was replacing using methods that algorithms were trying to ‘fix.’ The simple, mechanical tricks I used to make these images were not random, but studied; a testament to the idea there are no errors in an aesthetic, only in how it is utilized.

You Were Looking Away

Need A Miracle

You Were Looking Away

Rock Pile

You Were Looking Away

Street Preacher

You Were Looking Away

Crossing The Bridge

You Were Looking Away

Waiting Out The Rain

You Were Looking Away

Exploring

You Were Looking Away

On The Road

You Were Looking Away

Building

You Were Looking Away

Power

You Were Looking Away

Sitting Alone

You Were Looking Away

Plaid Pantry

You Were Looking Away

Parked

You Were Looking Away

The Kids

You Were Looking Away

The Wild

You Were Looking Away

Call It Progress

You Were Looking Away

Birds

You Were Looking Away

Parting Ways

You Were Looking Away

Looking Better

You Were Looking Away

On The Coast

Adjusting Focus

In our haste for a version of perfect, photography has left the truth of its soul behind.

The spread of photography quickly became the spread of photo manipulation. Instagram may have humble roots in photographers sharing images but in no way resembles that concept any longer. Advertising, as photography utilizes it, has become a disturbing social side of culture.

Using film-based cameras, I set out on a couple projects—this and Dissonance—to utilize the manual controls to create photogrpahs that would almost be impossible to create with a digital device. The goal of this series was not for the results to be unrecognizable, but rather more true to the essence of photography than how it has been used in American marketing; an appreciation of the act of exposure.

      Details
  • This series was predominantly shot in 2016 and 2017
  • Photos shot using a Leica M6 with a combination of Kodak T-Max 400, Ilford HP5 and 3200